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Your copyrights are about to change {video}

This video was recorded by Will Terry with guest Brad Holland. The information below is information that Will has provided in the description of his podcast. Please watch the video to get a better understanding of what is at stake and then TAKE ACTION and send your letter. Read a previous Artist Alert here


Artists! There’s a good chance we’re going to lose the rights to our work unless we stop legislation that’s being proposed to congress. This has the potential to infect every country in the world. We need your help to stop this as soon as possible! Brad Holland is an expert in this new legislation and explains why artists worldwide will suffer if our current copyright law is replaced by the new proposals.

Submit your letter here!
http://copyright.gov/policy/visualwor…

Sample letters from other artists: http://myemail.constantcontact.com/Ar…

Illustrators’ Partnership Blog: http://ipaorphanworks.blogspot.com

IPA Artists Alert
http://conta.cc/1KvRTCR

To sign-up for IPA Artists Alert
http://visitor.constantcontact.com/ma…

Copyright Office page where comments must be submitted online:
http://copyright.gov/policy/visualwor…

4 articles written about this:

Trojan Horse: Orphan Works and the War on Authors
by Brad Holland
http://www.jbiocommunication.org/free…

Orphan Works Legislation—A Bad Deal for Artists
by Bruce Lehman, Esq.
http://www.jbiocommunication.org/free…

Perfect and Strengthen Your Copyrights
by Cynthia Turner
http://www.jbiocommunication.org/free…

Artists’ Rights are Human Rights
By Chris Castle
http://www.jbiocommunication.org/free…

VIDEO: An Evening with Bruce Lehman
Webcast presentation from Society of Illustrators (SI)
New York – February 21, 2008
Sponsored by ASIP And SI
Q & A about illustrators’ reprographic rights and their right to remuneration.
http://www.asip-repro.org/resources.html

Orphan Works Roundtable
Conducted by the Small Business Administration
Salmagundi Art Club, New York, NY
Initiated by the Illustrators’ Partnership of America, the Artists Rights Society and the Advertising Photographers of America, and conducted by Tom Sullivan, Director of the Office of Advocacy of the US Small Business Administration. This was the first effort to assess the economic impact of the Orphan Works Acts H.R. 5889 and S. 2913 on creators and small businesses. Seventeen distinguished panelists spoke, all freelance working artists and stakeholders who would be directly impacted by this proposed legislation. Six 3’x4’ exhibit panels demonstrated orphan work infringements.
Presenter Bio
Reactions
Quote
Video: https://vimeo.com/channels/artistsrights
Presenters submitted written statements to IPA after the meeting. We compiled these into notebooks and distributed 14 notebooks of SBA Orphan Works Roundtable statements to key members of the Senate and House Judiciary Committees.

Artists Alert: The Return of Orphan Works Part 2 – ARTISTS’ LETTERS

Two weeks ago, we warned that Congress is drafting a new US Copyright Act.

The new recommendations would resurrect the failed Orphan Works Act of 2008. But there are new proposals that go far beyond Orphan Works.

The Copyright Office says that these artists’ issues are also “ripe” for legislation: copyright small claims, resale royalties, and other forms of secondary licensing which most artists have never heard of.
Many of you have already written. We hope many more will do the same.

Therefore we’re asking all artists concerned with retaining the rights to their work to join us in writing.


The deadline is THURSDAY: July 23, 2015
American Artists can submit letters online to the Copyright Office HERE.

Non-U.S. artists can email their letters to the attention of:
     Catherine Rowland
Senior Advisor to the Register of Copyrights
U.S. Copyright Office
     crowland@loc.gov

Read the Copyright Office Notice of Inquiry.
Read the 2015 Orphan Works and Mass Digitization Report.

Join us and send your letter TODAY!


Please write the Copyright Office

Because of our past opposition to orphan works legislation, the Copyright Office has issued a special Notice of Inquiry on Visual Works. In it, they acknowledge that visual artists face special problems in the marketplace and they’ve asked artists to respond to five questions:

  1. What are the most significant challenges related to monetizing and/or licensing photographs, graphic artworks, and/or illustrations?
  2. What are the most significant enforcement challenges for photographers, graphic artists, and/or illustrators?
  3. What are the most significant registration challenges for photographers, graphic artists, and/or illustrators?
  4. What are the most significant challenges or frustrations for those who wish to make legal use of photographs, graphic art works, and/or illustrations?
  5. What other issues or challenges should the Office be aware of regarding photographs, graphic artworks, and/or illustrations under the Copyright Act?

And we might suggest a 6th question of our own:
6. What are the most significant challenges artists would face if these new copyright proposals become law?

Since most artists have never written to lawmakers before, many of you have asked us for sample letters.

Eight artists have provided their letters to inspire you to write. The letters are poignant examples written respectfully by artists telling their own unique story about their experience and concerns:

Letter 1: Brad Holland’s, which is a very deep primer on these issues, and well worth reading, and adapting points as need be; he has written a legal article for the Columbia Law Journal, among other writings; “I’m writing to stress that for me, and for artists like me, copyright law is not an abstract legal issue. Our copyrights are our assets. Licensing them is how we make our livings.” Read more.

Letter 2: Ken Dubrowski, from the Boston area, who was one of the Founders of IPA; “As a freelance illustrator, I need to maintain revenue streams in order to make a living for my family. The resale of my past images is part of my day to day way of doing business.”  Read more.

Letter 3:  Keith Ferris, who is the founder of the Aviation Artists group; “My art is reasonably well known since it has served the advertising, editorial, public relations and historical documentation needs of the aerospace industry, publications, the military services and air and space museums for 68 years.” Read more.

Letter 4: “I am writing to you as an award winning professional illustrator of over 40 years whose work has appeared in many major publications, books and advertisements, both nationally and internationally.”
Read more.

Letter 5: “I have been a professional medical illustrator since 1975, and self-employed since 1981. During the course of my career, I have created thousands of illustrations…” Read more.

Letter 6: “Copyright is the basis of my income and ability to support my business. It is the only way I have to protect the accuracy and integrity of my work, and to negotiate an appropriate fee for re-licensing.” Read more.

Letter 7: “My specialty area is fetal development and women’s health illustration…The protection of these images is of utmost importance to my livelihood, and I have struggled to fight the rampant piracy of them, especially by political groups.” Read more.

Letter 8: Cynthia Turner, Co-President of ASIP, and deeply learned on copyright matters; her letter might also be adapted. “I am writing to ask that you create policy to protect visual authors and their exclusive rights, and support a sustainable environment for professional authorship. Read more.

Remember no one is asking you to write a legal brief. Copyright law is a business law, and the lawyers writing these laws know little or nothing about our business.

Let’s explain to them how the laws they’re writing will affect us.

– Brad Holland and Cynthia Turner for the Board of the Illustrators’ Partnership

Please post or forward this artist alert to any interested party

Click here


1Receive Artist Alerts from Illustrators Partnerships

Updates for visual artists on copyright reform and
2015 Orphan Works draft legislation

SIGN UP HERE


Convergence: 30th Anniversary Issue

Inside this issue of Convergence:

ASAI 30th Anniversary Conference, AIP 30 in Toronto

Last Year – Dallas Conference Notes

2015 President’s Letter

Anniversary Message from one of our co-founders

ASAI History at a Glance

People in Illustrations, Jen Mahoney

Vice President Greeting

Member at Large

AIA Convention

DOWNLOAD FULL ISSUE HERE

Copyright Message from Co-founder, Frank Costantino

A message from the American Society of Architectural Illustrators co-founder and Vice -President of the Illustrators Partnership of America (IPA), Frank Costantino.

Dear Director & Art Groups,

I am sending the attached alert to as many art groups of which I’m a member, exhibitor or have an association, to alert all artists to an imposing, sweeping law for Congress – a new proposed version of the Orphan Works Bill – that will subvert & subsume artist rights to their own work.

For the past 15 years, I have been a charter member and Vice-President of the Illustrators Partnership of America (IPA), the mother organization to a representative body of 12 national artists associations called the American Society of Illustrators Partnership (ASIP). I have been vigorously working with my colleagues from around the country to marshall support against this disadvantageous bill. The authors of this Alert notice are my colleagues & fellow officers who have helped research and frame this critical information.

As its Co-founder and President Emeritus, I also represent the American Society of Architectural Illustrators (ASAI), now 30 years old, and one of the oldest and most respected organizations of this profession worldwide. You can find more info on the above groups with the links in the above Alert, and here:
http://www.illustratorspartnership.org/index.php
https://asaihq.wpengine.com/Home

I am asking you to carefully read this article, understand its meaning and implications, and initiate action for the many members of your groups. The action consists of a letter to the copyright office stating one’s objections to this legislation, utilizing one or more of the suggested points that are outlined in the above document.

Please share this link, alert your members to action, provide direction, publicize wherever you can, and encourage submissions to the Copyright Office.

Your further distribution of this notice to other arts groups and independent artists would be most appreciated. I will continue to do the same.

As you may know or recall, earlier versions of proposed Orphan Works Bills were defeated in 2006 and 2008 via a similar grass roots response from IPA, ASIP, ASAI and other groups letters to Congress and the Copyright Office.

The urgency of now is the Copyright Office’s posted deadline of July 23 for submitting letters.

Your timely attention to my request can only accrue to your benefit, and all those you know. Let me know you have received this, if you will be able to initiate action, or if you might need further info.

Please do your part to protect your Art.
Many Thanks!
Frank M Costantino
ASAI, ASIP, FAIA, JARA, FSAI

FM Costantino, Cos.
617-846-4766
fmcostantino.com/gallery/

Artists Alert: From the Illustrators Partnership

The Return of Orphan Works
Part 1: “The Next Great Copyright Act”

 

For more than a year Congress has been holding hearings for the drafting of a brand new US Copyright Act. At its heart is the return of Orphan Works.

Twice, Orphan Works Acts have failed to pass Congress because of strong opposition from visual artists, spearheaded by the Illustrators Partnership.

Because of this, the Copyright Office has now issued a special call for letters regarding the role of visual art in the coming legislation.

Therefore we’re asking all artists concerned with

retaining the rights to their work to join us in writing.

When and Where
Deadline: July 23, 2015
You can submit letters online to the Copyright Office HERE.
Read the Copyright Office Notice of Inquiry.
Read the 2015 Orphan Works and Mass Digitization Report.

Join us and send your letter TODAY!


Here are the Basic Facts

“The Next Great Copyright Act” would replace all existing copyright law.

  • It would void our Constitutional right to the exclusive control of our work.
  • It would “privilege” the public’s right to use our work.
  • It would “pressure” you to register your work with commercial registries.
  • It would “orphan” unregistered work.
  • It would make orphaned work available for commercial infringement by “good faith” infringers.
  • It would allow others to alter your work and copyright these “derivative works” in their own names.
  • It would affect all visual art: drawings, paintings, sketches, photos, etc.; past, present and future; published and unpublished; domestic and foreign.

Background

The demand for copyright “reform” has come from large Internet firms and the legal scholars allied with them. Their business models involve supplying the public with access to other people’s copyrighted work. Their problem has been how to do this legally and without paying artists.

The “reforms” they’ve proposed would allow them to stock their databases with our pictures. This would happen either by forcing us to hand over our images to them as registered works, or by harvesting unregistered works as orphans and copyrighting them in their own names as “derivative works.”

The Copyright Office acknowledges that this will cause special problems for visual artists but concludes that we should still be subject to orphan works law.

The “Next Great Copyright Act” would go further than previous Orphan Works Acts. The proposals under consideration include:

     1.) The Mass Digitization of our intellectual property by corporate interests.
     2.) Extended Collective Licensing, a form of socialized licensing that would replace  voluntary business agreements between artists and their clients.
     3.) A Copyright Small Claims Court to handle the flood of lawsuits expected to result  from orphan works infringements.

Join us and send your letter TODAY!

In your letter to the Copyright Office:

It’s important that lawmakers be told that our copyrights are our source of income because lobbyists and corporation lawyers have “testified” that once our work has been published it has virtually no further commercial value and should therefore be available for use by the public.

So when writing, please remember:

  • It’s important that you make your letter personal and truthful.
  • Keep it professional and respectful.
  • Explain that you’re an artist and have been one for x number of years.
  • Briefly list your educational background, publications, awards, etc.
  • Indicate the field(s) you work in.
  • Explain clearly and forcefully that for you, copyright law is not an abstract legal issue, but the basis on which your business rests.
  • Our copyrights are the products we license.
  • This means that infringing our work is like stealing our money.
  • It’s important to our businesses that we remain able to determine voluntarily how and by whom our work is used.
  • Stress that your work does NOT lose its value upon publication.
  • Instead everything you create becomes part of your business inventory.
  • In the digital era, inventory is more valuable to artists than ever before.

If you are NOT a professional artist:

  • Define your specific interest in copyright, and give a few relevant details.
  • You might want to stress that it’s important to you that you determine how and by whom your work is used.
  • You might wish to state that even if you’re a hobbyist, you would not welcome someone else monetizing your work for their own profit without your knowledge or consent.

1Receive Artist Alerts from Illustrators Partnerships

Updates for visual artists on copyright reform and 2015 Orphan Works draft legislation

SIGN UP HERE

Because this is a complicated issue, we’ll follow up next week with some expanded thoughts of our own. .

– Brad Holland and Cynthia Turner for the Board of the Illustrators Partnership


The Illustrators Partnership has filed multiple papers with the Copyright Office regarding this issue.

You can download them from the Copyright Office website:

Remedies for Small Copyright Claims
January 17, 2012

Orphan Works and Mass Digitization Initial Comments
February 3, 2013

Orphan Works and Mass Digitization
Reply Comments, March 6, 2013

Orphan Works and Mass Digitization
Additional Comments, May 21, 2014

Please post or forward this artists alert to any interested party.

CFE Deadline: Architecture in Perspective 30 CASH PRIZES AWARDED

AIP 30 -CFE Ad- 550x300
American Society of Architectural Illustrators celebrates 30 years of excellence in architectural illustration. To commemorate this special occasion cash prizes will be awarded for some of the top recipients selected for the AIP 30 exhibition. See the website for more details. www.ASAI.org
Deadline for entries:
Professional Competition: Monday, January 12, 2015 at 5pm EST
Student Competition: Monday, February 9, 2015 at 5pm EST

Sign up for the ASAI newsletter to stay updated with news and broadcasts: http://forms.aweber.com/form/19/188987519.htm

2015 Vice President: Carlos Cristerna, Neoscape

Please take a moment to congratulate and welcome our newest Vice President..
Cristerna, Carlos -150pxCarlos Cristerna | Director of Visualization | Associate Principal
With Neoscape since 2005, Carlos leads the studio’s 3D visualization teams. His background in architecture, balanced with an established artistic expertise, is reflected in all aspects of his work, each piece deftly choreographed for its intended audience. As 3D Visualization Director, Carlos oversees Neoscape’s digital artists, constantly pushing technological, creative, and artistic limits to achieve the most beautiful and impactful work possible.
His decade of experience encompasses everything from architecture, design, photography and film, and provides him with an enviable skill set that makes him a finalist for multiple architectural illustration awards annually. Carlos received the ASAI Award of Excellence in 2009, and in 2010 his work was recognized with the ASAI Formal Award. Most recently, he oversaw a project that was awarded ASAI’s prestigious 2013 Hugh Ferriss Memorial Prize. His work has also been featured in publications such as 3D World and Ballistic Publishing’s Exposé and Elemental books. Carlos also served as a judge for CGarchitect’s annual 3D Awards this past spring.
Carlos graduated with a Bachelor of Architecture from the Universidad Autonoma de Sinaloa.

Sign up for the ASAI newsletter to stay updated with news and broadcasts

An Architect Who Got Side-Tracked

ASAI’s co-founder, Steve Oles is the new avatar for SketchUp 2015.

From SketchUp:

Paul Stevenson (Steve) Oles, FAIA, is an architect and co-founder of the American Society of Architectural Illustrators. He is also the author of “Architectural Illustration: The Value Delineation Process” and a former winner of the Hugh Ferriss Memorial Prize. Steve takes pleasure in long walks, working out, designing all sorts of things, and riding the roads of New Mexico on his beloved ’08 Triumph Bonneville.

If you’ve ever used the assorted styles in the SketchUp’s Styles dialogue, take a look at the PSO styles — those were developed with Steve’s work as inspiration as well as his eye for detail. And if you’re using SketchUp 2015, take a closer look at the scale figure that loads in many of our default templates. It just happens to be our friend, Steve Oles.”

SketchUpVideo

From the Expo Floor – Thursday

At any given time during the day this is the traffic of Architects that have been walking by the ASAI Gallery at the AIA Convention in Denver. That’s a lot of people! And ASAI members are getting exposure to this massive group of people.

Traffic walking past ASAI Gallery at AIA Convention in Denver, June 2013

Today I walked the Expo floor looking for opportunities for ASAI both corporately and for it’s membership. The vendors I have spoken to have been very interested in what I have to tell them about our organization. I have the opportunity to share member work and make some great connections for our AIP 28 Conference in San Francisco.
AIP 28 Conference in San Francisco.

From Denver,Tina

ASAI in Denver at AIA Convention

ASAI is very excited to be representing its members at the AIA Convention in Denver. We have created a gallery displaying 15 previous Architecture in Perspective covers as well as a digital display featuring AIP 27 selected artists. The convention’s expo is June 21-23. ASAI’s Executive Director, Tina Bryant, will be canvassing the expo floor to raise awareness of who ASAI is and how valuable its members are to the architectural industry.

Gallery walls at AIA Convention
Digital display at AIA Convention in Denver

I will continue to update the website with pictures and news from the expo floor. From Denver, have a fantastic day! Tina